Webcast: In-house Guidance for Managing Non-U.S. Antitrust Investigations

October 27, 2020

With more than 130 competition authorities around the world, companies face numerous challenges in managing antitrust investigations outside the United States. This program helps keep in-house counsel a step ahead of the competition authorities in Latin America, Europe, Asia, and Oceania by highlighting their enforcement priorities in the coming year. The panel discusses the top ten issues to consider when facing a domestic investigation in a non-US jurisdiction, including key decisions companies should address in the first hours and days after an investigation is launched, and strategies to effectively advocate for an authority to close its investigation.

View Slides (PDF)



PANELISTS:

Scott Hammond is a partner in the Washington, D.C. office and co-chair of the firm’s Antitrust and Competition Practice Group. He focuses on cartel investigations conducted by the US DOJ and by competition authorities abroad. From 2005 to 2013, Scott served as the US DOJ’s Deputy Assistant Attorney General for Criminal Antitrust Enforcement and oversaw all of the US DOJ’s domestic and international criminal antitrust investigations and litigation and was the principal point of contact for cartel matters with senior competition officials abroad. Scott serves as global coordinating counsel in cross border government investigations running in parallel with US DOJ investigations and as bridge counsel for multinational companies before competition authorities in Latin America, Asia and Europe.

Kristen Limarzi is a partner in the Washington, D.C. office, where her practice focuses on investigations, litigation, and counseling on antitrust merger and conduct matters, as well as appellate and civil litigation. Kristen previously served as the Chief of the Appellate Section of the U.S. Department of Justice’s Antitrust Division, where she led a team of more than a dozen professionals litigating appeals in the Division’s civil and criminal enforcement actions and participating as amicus curiae in private antitrust actions.

Jeremy Robison is a partner in the Washington, D.C. office. His practice focuses on defending companies and individuals involved in antitrust investigations by U.S. and international enforcement authorities, conducting internal investigations, and advising companies on antitrust compliance programs and policies. Jeremy has represented clients from a range of industries in antitrust investigations, including in the financial services, pharmaceutical, defense, healthcare, and technology sectors.

Sarah Akhtar is an associate in the Washington D.C. Office. She is a member of the firm’s Litigation, Appellate and Constitutional Law, and Antitrust practice groups. Prior to joining the firm, Ms. Akhtar clerked for Chief Judge R. Guy Cole, Jr. of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit. She earned her undergraduate degree with honors from Harvard University, where she was Editor-in-Chief of the Harvard International Review.


MCLE CREDIT INFORMATION:

This program has been approved for credit in accordance with the requirements of the New York State Continuing Legal Education Board for a maximum of 1.5 credit hour, of which 1.5 credit hour may be applied toward the areas of professional practice requirement. This course is approved for transitional/non-transitional credit.

Attorneys seeking New York credit must obtain an Affirmation Form prior to watching the archived version of this webcast. Please contact CLE@gibsondunn.com to request the MCLE form.

Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher LLP certifies that this activity has been approved for MCLE credit by the State Bar of California in the amount of 1.5 hour.

California attorneys may claim “self-study” credit for viewing the archived version of this webcast. No certificate of attendance is required for California “self-study” credit.