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Client Alert

June 22, 2018

Supreme Court Says That Patent Holders May Recover Lost Foreign Profits Resulting From Patent Infringement In The United States

Click for PDF WesternGeco LLC v. ION Geophysical Corp., No. 16-1011  Decided June 22, 2018 Today, the Supreme Court held 7-2 that federal law permits a patent holder to recover damages for overseas losses from a defendant that infringes its patent by shipping components of a patented invention from the United States to be assembled abroad. Background: 35 U.S.C. § 271(f)(2) imposes liability for patent infringement when a company ships components of a patented invention overseas to be assembled in a way that would constitute patent infringement in the United States.  35 U.S.C. § 284 permits patent owners who prove infringement under § 271(f)(2) to recover damages, but the statute is silent on whether damages are available for losses incurred outside of the United States as a result of the infringement.  WesternGeco, which owns patents related to ocean-floor surveying technology, proved patent infringement under § 271(f)(2) and was awarded damages pursuant to § 284 for lost profits incurred abroad. Issue: Whether awarding damages for lost foreign profits to a patent owner who proves patent infringement under 35 U.S.C. § 271(f)(2) comports with the presumption that federal statutes apply only within the territorial jurisdiction of the United States. Court’s Holding: Yes.  Awarding damages for lost foreign profits to a patent owner who proves patent infringement under § 271(f)(2) does not violate the presumption against extraterritoriality. “[T]he focus . . . , in a case involving infringement under [35 U.S.C.] § 271(f)(2), is on the act of exporting components from the United States.” Justice Thomas, writing for the 7-2 majority What It Means: The Court’s holding means that a patent holder who proves infringement under 35 U.S.C. § 271(f)(2) can recover damages for lost foreign profits.  The Court expressly declined to decide whether a patent holder can recover lost foreign profits for infringement under other provisions of the Patent Act. The Court did not reach the question of whether the damages provision of the Patent Act, 35 U.S.C. § 284, applies extraterritorially.  Instead, the Court concluded that WesternGeco’s claim for lost foreign profits involved a domestic application of § 284 because it sought a remedy for conduct that occurred in the United States—the export by domestic entities of component parts from the United States. Whether the decision will have broader implications in other areas of U.S. law remains to be seen, since the language of the decision strongly suggests that its holding will be cabined to the context of patent infringement. Gibson Dunn’s lawyers are available to assist in addressing any questions you may have regarding developments at the Supreme Court.  Please feel free to contact the following practice leaders: Appellate and Constitutional Law Practice Caitlin J. Halligan +1 212.351.3909 challigan@gibsondunn.com Mark A. Perry +1 202.887.3667 mperry@gibsondunn.com Nicole A. Saharsky +1 202.887.3669 nsaharsky@gibsondunn.com   Related Practice: Intellectual Property Wayne Barsky +1 310.552.8500 wbarsky@gibsondunn.com Josh Krevitt +1 212.351.4000 jkrevitt@gibsondunn.com Mark Reiter +1 214.698.3100 mreiter@gibsondunn.com   © 2018 Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher LLP Attorney Advertising:  The enclosed materials have been prepared for general informational purposes only and are not intended as legal advice
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June 22, 2018

Supreme Court Holds That Individuals Have Fourth Amendment Privacy Rights In Cell Phone Location Records

Click for PDF Carpenter v. United States, No. 16-402  Decided June 22, 2018 The Supreme Court held 5-4 that law enforcement officials must generally obtain a warrant when seeking historical cell phone location records from a telecommunications provider. Background: Wireless carriers regularly collect and store information reflecting the location of cell phones when those phones connect to cell sites to transmit and receive information.  Prosecutors collected a suspect’s cell-site location data from wireless carriers following the procedure in the Stored Communications Act, 18 U.S.C. §§ 2701-12, but without obtaining a warrant.  The suspect argued that the Government’s acquisition of this data without a warrant was an unconstitutional search that violated the Fourth Amendment.  This argument set up a conflict between two lines of Supreme Court precedent: the longstanding third-party doctrine, which holds that information a person voluntarily reveals to others is not protected by the Fourth Amendment; and several recent cases holding that cell phones implicate significant privacy concerns because so many people store large amounts of information on them. Issue: Whether an individual has a protected privacy interest under the Fourth Amendment in historical cell phone location records. Court’s Holding: Yes.  The Fourth Amendment protects cell phone location records because of their comprehensive and private nature, even though they are collected and held by the phone company.  The Government must ordinarily obtain a warrant before acquiring the records. “In light of the deeply revealing nature of [cell site location data], its depth, breadth, and comprehensive reach, and the inescapable and automatic nature of its collection, the fact that such information is gathered by a third party does not make it any less deserving of Fourth Amendment protection.” Chief Justice Roberts, writing for the 5-4 majority What It Means: The decision continues a trend of recent Supreme Court decisions limiting Government access to personal information stored electronically.  In United States v. Jones (2012), the Court unanimously rejected the Government’s argument that it could place a GPS tracker on a suspect’s car without a warrant, although it divided as to the reason.  Likewise, in Riley v. California (2014), the Court unanimously declined to allow police officers to routinely search cell phones incident to arrest, based in part on the volume and importance of personal information stored on them. The Court emphasized that its decision was limited to the collection of historical cell phone location records covering an extended period of time.  The Court declined to consider whether the Fourth Amendment protected real-time cell phone location information or historical location data covering a shorter period of time than the Government collected here (seven days).  The Court also emphasized that it was not calling into question conventional surveillance tools such as security cameras, or collection techniques involving foreign affairs or national security. The Court expressly declined to overrule the third-party doctrine.  Instead, it stated that the doctrine should not be extended to historical cell site location data because the breadth and depth of the information available made that data “qualitatively different” from other information that the Court had previously allowed the Government to obtain from third parties without a warrant. Gibson Dunn’s lawyers are available to assist in addressing any questions you may have regarding developments at the Supreme Court.  Please feel free to contact the following practice leaders: Appellate and Constitutional Law Practice Caitlin J. Halligan +1 212.351.3909 challigan@gibsondunn.com Mark A. Perry +1 202.887.3667 mperry@gibsondunn.com Nicole A. Saharsky +1 202.887.3669 nsaharsky@gibsondunn.com   Related Practice: Privacy, Cybersecurity and Consumer Protection Ahmed Baladi +33 (0) 1 56 43 13 00 abaladi@gibsondunn.com Alexander H. Southwell +1 212.351.3981 asouthwell@gibsondunn.com   Related Practice: White Collar Defense and Investigations Joel M. Cohen +1 212.351.2664 jcohen@gibsondunn.com Charles J. Stevens +1 415.393.8391 cstevens@gibsondunn.com F. Joseph Warin +1 202.887.3609 fwarin@gibsondunn.com   © 2018 Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher LLP Attorney Advertising:  The enclosed materials have been prepared for general informational purposes only and are not intended as legal advice.
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June 21, 2018

Supreme Court Rules That SEC ALJs Were Unconstitutionally Appointed

Click for PDF Lucia v. SEC, No. 17-130  Decided June 21, 2018 Today, the Supreme Court held that administrative law judges of the Securities and Exchange Commission are inferior “Officers of the United States” within the meaning of the Constitution’s Appointments Clause.  Thus, the ALJs were unconstitutionally appointed by SEC staff. Background: The SEC has relied on ALJs to resolve hundreds of enforcement actions.  Raymond Lucia challenged the lawfulness of sanctions that the SEC had imposed on him, arguing that the ALJ hearing his case was not constitutionally appointed.  He asserted that SEC ALJs are “Officers of the United States” under the Constitution’s Appointments Clause, which requires such officers to be appointed by the President, “Courts of Law,” or “Heads of Departments.” SEC ALJs, however, were appointed by agency staff.  A panel of the D.C. Circuit held that the ALJs are mere “employees”—governmental officials with lesser responsibilities than “Officers” and thus not subject to the Appointments Clause.  An evenly divided en banc court affirmed. Issue: Whether SEC ALJs are “Officers of the United States” subject to the Appointments Clause. Court's Holding: Yes.  Because SEC ALJs exercise “significant authority pursuant to the laws of the United States,” they are inferior “Officers” under the Appointments Clause.  As such, the ALJs may not be appointed by agency staff and must instead be appointed by the President, the SEC itself, or a court of law. “[T]he Commission’s ALJs issue decisions containing factual findings, legal conclusions, and appropriate remedies. . . . And when the SEC declines review (and issues an order saying so), the ALJ’s decision itself ‘becomes final’ and is ‘deemed the action of the Commission.’” Justice Kagan, writing for the Court Gibson Dunn represented the winning party:  Raymond Lucia What It Means: The ruling largely rests on the Court’s conclusion that SEC ALJs are “near-carbon copies” of special trial judges of the Tax Court that the Court had previously found were inferior “Officers” because they exercise “significant authority.”  See Freytag v. Commissioner, 501 U.S. 868 (1991). The ruling provides new guidance on the relief available for litigants who make a timely Appointments Clause challenge:  The Court ordered the SEC to provide Mr. Lucia a new hearing before a different ALJ who has been constitutionally appointed, reasoning that the ALJ who originally presided over Mr. Lucia’s case could not be expected to consider the case “as though he had not adjudicated it before.” Before the Court issued its decision, the SEC released an order purporting to “ratify” the past ALJ appointments, but the Court did not address the validity of that order.   Gibson Dunn’s lawyers are available to assist in addressing any questions you may have regarding developments at the Supreme Court.  Please feel free to contact the following practice leaders: Appellate and Constitutional Law Practice Caitlin J. Halligan +1 212.351.3909 challigan@gibsondunn.com Mark A. Perry +1 202.887.3667 mperry@gibsondunn.com Nicole A. Saharsky +1 202.887.3669 nsaharsky@gibsondunn.com   Related Practice: Securities Enforcement Marc J. Fagel +1 415.393.8332 mfagel@gibsondunn.com Barry R. Goldsmith +1 212.351.2440 bgoldsmith@gibsondunn.com Richard W. Grime +1 202.955.8219 rgrime@gibsondunn.com Mark K. Schonfeld +1 212.351.2433 mschonfeld@gibsondunn.com   © 2018 Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher LLP Attorney Advertising:  The enclosed materials have been prepared for general informational purposes only and are not intended as legal advice.
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June 21, 2018

Supreme Court Holds That States Can Require Internet Retailers To Collect Sales Taxes

Click for PDF South Dakota v. Wayfair, Inc., No. 17-494  Decided June 21, 2018 Today, the Supreme Court held 5-4 that States may require internet retailers to collect sales taxes on online purchases. Background: In Quill Corp. v. North Dakota, 504 U.S. 298 (1992), the Supreme Court reaffirmed that States could not require catalog retailers to collect sales taxes if the retailers were not physically present in the State.  In a 2015 concurrence, Justice Kennedy urged the Court to reconsider Quill because it inflicted “extreme harm and unfairness” on States unable to tax the ever-growing number of online transactions.  That urging spurred multiple States, including South Dakota, to require internet retailers to collect sales taxes notwithstanding their lack of a physical presence in the State.  South Dakota then sued a number of internet retailers for not collecting sales taxes. Issue: Whether the Court should overrule Quill’s physical presence requirement and allow States to require retailers to collect sales taxes, even if the retailer is not physically present in the State. Court’s Holding: States may require the collection of sales taxes by retailers with no physical presence in the State. “In the name of federalism and free markets, Quill does harm to both. The physical presence rule it defines has limited States’ ability to seek long-term prosperity and has prevented market participants from competing on an even playing field.” Justice Kennedy, writing for the majority What It Means: The Court overruled Quill because its physical presence rule was unnecessary to satisfy due process or the Commerce Clause’s requirement that state taxes not “unduly burden” interstate commerce.  The Court observed that “Quill has come to serve as a judicially created tax shelter for businesses that decide to limit their physical presence and still sell their goods and services to a State’s consumers,” and that the “Internet revolution” has only made Quill’s rule “further removed from economic reality.” Still, under the Commerce Clause, States may tax only those activities that have a “substantial nexus” to the State.  The Court held that South Dakota’s tax satisfied that test because it applied only to retailers that delivered more than $100,000 of goods in the State or engaged in more than 200 transactions in the State. South Dakota, and the other States that have passed similar tax laws, will now require internet retailers to charge sales taxes on online purchases.  States lost between $8 and $33 billion in sales taxes every year under the old physical presence rule. More States may now require internet retailers to collect sales taxes.  These States may also change alternative tax provisions that they had enacted to make up for sales-tax shortfalls from internet retailers under Quill. Gibson Dunn’s lawyers are available to assist in addressing any questions you may have regarding developments at the Supreme Court.  Please feel free to contact the following practice leaders: Appellate and Constitutional Law Practice Caitlin J. Halligan +1 212.351.3909 challigan@gibsondunn.com Mark A. Perry +1 202.887.3667 mperry@gibsondunn.com Nicole A. Saharsky +1 202.887.3669 nsaharsky@gibsondunn.com   © 2018 Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher LLP Attorney Advertising:  The enclosed materials have been prepared for general informational purposes only and are not intended as legal advice.
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June 20, 2018

Acting Associate AG Panuccio Highlights DOJ’s False Claims Act Enforcement Reform Efforts

Click for PDF On June 14, 2018, Acting Associate Attorney General Jesse Panuccio gave remarks highlighting recent enforcement activity and policy initiatives by the Department of Justice ("DOJ").  The remarks, delivered at the American Bar Association's 12th National Institute on the Civil False Claims Act and Qui Tam Enforcement, included extensive commentary about DOJ's ongoing efforts to introduce reforms to promote a more fair and consistent application of the False Claims Act ("FCA").  While the impact of these policy initiatives remains to be seen, DOJ's continued focus on these efforts, led by officials at the highest levels within DOJ, suggests that FCA enforcement reform is a priority for the Department. After giving an overview of several FCA settlements from the last eighteen months—apparently designed to demonstrate that this DOJ recognizes the importance of the FCA in a breadth of traditional enforcement areas—Mr. Panuccio discussed two particular priorities: the opioid epidemic and the nation's elderly population.  He emphasized that DOJ would "actively employ" the FCA against any entity in the opioid distribution chain that engages in fraudulent conduct.  He then highlighted the crucial role of the FCA in protecting the nation's elderly from fraud and abuse, citing examples of enforcement against a nursing home management company, hospices, and skilled rehabilitation facilities. The majority of Mr. Panuccio's remarks focused, however, on policy initiatives DOJ is undertaking to ensure that enforcement "is fair and consistent with the rule of law."  Mr. Panuccio alluded to general reform initiatives by the department, such as the ban on certain third-party payments in settlement agreements, before expanding on reforms specific to the FCA.  Mr. Panuccio highlighted that the recent FCA reform efforts have been spearheaded by Deputy Associate Attorney General Stephen Cox; Mr. Cox had delivered remarks at the Federal Bar Association Qui Tam Conference in February of this year that had provided insight into the positions articulated in the Brand and Granston memoranda.  In his speech, Mr. Panuccio described five policy initiatives being undertaken by DOJ to reform FCA enforcement: (i) qui tam dismissal criteria; (ii) the use of guidance in FCA cases; (iii) cooperation credit; (iv) compliance program credit; and (v) preventing "piling on." Qui tam dismissals Mr. Panuccio acknowledged the tremendous increase in the number qui tam cases that are filed each year, which includes cases that are not in the public interest.  Recognizing that DOJ expends significant resources to monitor cases even when it declines to intervene, Mr. Panuccio noted that DOJ attorneys have been instructed to consider whether moving to dismiss the action would be an appropriate use of prosecutorial discretion under the FCA.  While DOJ previously exercised this authority only rarely, consistent with the Granston memo, Mr. Panuccio suggested that, going forward, DOJ may use that authority more frequently in order to free up DOJ's resources for matters in the public interest. Although defendants generally may not yet be experiencing significant differences regarding the possibility of dismissal at the DOJ line level, the continued public discussion of the potential use of DOJ's dismissal authority by high-level officials suggests that DOJ appreciates the problems caused by frivolous qui tams and may ultimately be more receptive to dismissal of actions lacking merit. Guidance As stated in the Brand Memorandum, DOJ will no longer use noncompliance with agency guidance that expands upon statutory or regulatory requirements as the basis for an FCA violation.  Mr. Panuccio explained that, in an FCA case, evidence that a party received a guidance document would be relevant in proving that the party had knowledge of the law explained in that guidance.  However, DOJ attorneys have been instructed "not to use [DOJ's] enforcement authority to convert sub-regulatory guidance into rules that have the force or effect of law." Cooperation With respect to cooperation credit, Mr. Panuccio indicated that DOJ is working on formalizing its practices and that modifications to prior practices should be expected.  That notwithstanding, Mr. Panuccio provided assurances that DOJ will continue to "expect and recognize genuine cooperation" in both civil and criminal matters.  He also noted that the extent of the discount provided when negotiating a settlement would depend on the nature of the cooperation, how helpful it was, and whether it helped identify individual wrongdoers. Though DOJ's new policies on cooperation credit are still forthcoming, Mr. Panuccio's remarks suggest that formal cooperation credit might be expanded to cover situations outside of those in which the defendant makes a self-disclosure. Compliance In recognition of the challenges of running large organizations, DOJ will "reward companies that invest in strong compliance measures."  How this may differ, if at all, from current ad hoc considerations remains to be seen. Piling On Mr. Panuccio acknowledged that, when multiple regulatory bodies pursue a defendant for the same or substantially the same conduct, "unwarranted and disproportionate penalties" can result. In order to avoid this "piling on," DOJ attorneys will promote coordination within the agency and other regulatory bodies to ensure that defendants are subject to fair punishment and receive the benefit of finality that should accompany a settlement.  Moreover, Mr. Panuccio remarked that DOJ attorneys should not "invoke the threat of criminal prosecution solely to persuade a company to pay a larger settlement in a civil case," which really is simply a restatement of every attorney's existing ethical duty.  Whether DOJ leadership's interest here will result in significant practical developments is uncertain.  Such developments, though perhaps unlikely, could include eliminating the cross-designation of Assistant U.S. Attorneys as both Civil and Criminal; limiting the ability of Civil Division attorneys to invite Criminal Division lawyers to participate in meetings without the request or consent of defendants; or perhaps even somehow inhibiting the Civil Division from using the FCA, with its mandatory treble damages and per-claim penalties, following criminal fines and restitution. We will continue to monitor and report on these important developments. The following Gibson Dunn lawyers assisted in preparing this client update: Stephen Payne, Jonathan Phillips and Claudia Kraft. Gibson Dunn's lawyers have handled hundreds of FCA investigations and have a long track record of litigation success.  Among other significant victories, Gibson Dunn successfully argued the landmark Allison Engine case in the Supreme Court, a unanimous decision that prompted Congressional action.  See Allison Engine Co. v. United States ex rel. Sanders, 128 S. Ct. 2123 (2008).  Our win rate and immersion in FCA issues gives us the ability to frame strategies to quickly dispose of FCA cases.  The firm has more than 30 attorneys with substantive FCA expertise and more than 30 former Assistant U.S. Attorneys and DOJ attorneys.  For more information, please feel free to contact the Gibson Dunn attorney with whom you work or the following attorneys. Washington, D.C. F. Joseph Warin (+1 202-887-3609, fwarin@gibsondunn.com) Stuart F. Delery (+1 202-887-3650, sdelery@gibsondunn.com) Joseph D. West (+1 202-955-8658, jwest@gibsondunn.com) Andrew S. Tulumello (+1 202-955-8657, atulumello@gibsondunn.com) Karen L. Manos (+1 202-955-8536, kmanos@gibsondunn.com) Stephen C. Payne (+1 202-887-3693, spayne@gibsondunn.com) Jonathan M. Phillips (+1 202-887-3546, jphillips@gibsondunn.com) New York Reed Brodsky (+1 212-351-5334, rbrodsky@gibsondunn.com) Alexander H. Southwell (+1 212-351-3981, asouthwell@gibsondunn.com) Denver Robert C. Blume (+1 303-298-5758, rblume@gibsondunn.com) Monica K. Loseman (+1 303-298-5784, mloseman@gibsondunn.com) John D.W. Partridge (+1 303-298-5931, jpartridge@gibsondunn.com) Ryan T. Bergsieker (+1 303-298-5774, rbergsieker@gibsondunn.com) Dallas Robert C. Walters (+1 214-698-3114, rwalters@gibsondunn.com) Los Angeles Timothy J. Hatch (+1 213-229-7368, thatch@gibsondunn.com) James L. Zelenay Jr. (+1 213-229-7449, jzelenay@gibsondunn.com) Palo Alto Benjamin Wagner (+1 650-849-5395, bwagner@gibsondunn.com) San Francisco Charles J. Stevens (+1 415-393-8391, cstevens@gibsondunn.com)Winston Y. Chan (+1 415-393-8362, wchan@gibsondunn.com) © 2018 Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher LLP Attorney Advertising:  The enclosed materials have been prepared for general informational purposes only and are not intended as legal advice.
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June 14, 2018

Revisions to the FFIEC BSA/AML Manual to Include the New CDD Regulation

Click for PDF On May 11, 2018, the federal bank regulators and the Financial Crimes Enforcement Network ("FinCEN") published two new chapters of the Federal Financial Institution Examination Council Bank Secrecy Act/Anti-Money Laundering Examination Manual ("BSA/AML Manual") to reflect changes made by FinCEN to the CDD regulation.[1]  One of the chapters replaces the current chapter "Customer Due Diligence – Overview and Examination Procedures" ("CDD Chapter"), and the other chapter is entirely new and contains an overview of and examination procedures for "Beneficial Ownership for Legal Entity Customers" to reflect the beneficial ownership requirements of the CDD regulation ("Beneficial Ownership Chapter").[2] The new CDD Chapter builds upon the previous chapter, adds the requirements of the CDD regulation, and otherwise updates the chapter, which had not been revised since 2007.  The Beneficial Ownership Chapter largely repeats what is in the CDD Rule.  Both new chapters reference the regulatory guidance and clarifications from the Frequently Asked Questions issued by FinCEN on April 3, 2018 (the "FAQs").[3]   Other Refinements to the CDD Regulation May Impact the BSA/AML Manual Implementation of the CDD regulation is a dynamic process and may require further refinement of these chapters as FinCEN issues further guidance.  For instance, in response to concerns of the banking industry, on May 16, 2018, FinCEN issued an administrative ruling imposing a 90-day moratorium on the requirement to recertify CDD information when certificates of deposit ("CDs") are rolled over or loans renewed (if the CDs or loans were opened before May 11, 2018).  FinCEN will have further discussions with the banking industry and will make a decision whether to make this temporary exception permanent within this 90-day period (before August 9, 2018).[4] In his May 16, 2018, testimony at a House Financial Services Committee hearing on "Implementation of FinCEN's Customer Due Diligence Rule," FinCEN Director Kenneth Blanco suggested that FinCEN may be receptive to refinements as compliance experience is gained with the regulation.  Director Blanco also indicated that there will be a period of adjustment for compliance with the regulation and that FinCEN and the regulators will not engage in "gotcha" enforcement, but are seeking "good faith compliance." Highlights from the New Chapters Periodic Reviews:  The BSA/AML Manual no longer expressly requires periodic CDD reviews, but suggests that regulators may still expect periodic reviews for higher risk customers.  The language in the previous CDD Chapter requiring periodic CDD refresh reviews has been eliminated.[5]Consistent with FAQ 14, the new CDD Chapter states that updating CDD information will be event driven and provides a list of possible event triggers, such as red flags identified through suspicious activity monitoring or receipt of a criminal subpoena.  Nevertheless, the CDD Chapter does not completely eliminate the expectation of periodic reviews for higher risk clients, stating:  "Information provided by higher profile customers and their transactions should be reviewed . . . more frequently throughout the term of the relationship with the bank."Although this appears to be a relaxation of the expectation to conduct periodic reviews, we expect many banks will not change their current practices.  For a number of years, in addition to event driven reviews, many banks have conducted periodic CDD reviews at risk based intervals because they have understood periodic reviews to be a regulatory expectation. Lower Beneficial Ownership Thresholds:  Somewhat surprisingly, there is no expression in the new chapters that consideration should be given to obtaining beneficial ownership at a lower threshold than 25% for certain high risk business lines or customer types.  The new Beneficial Ownership Chapter simply repeats the regulatory requirement stating that:  "The beneficial ownership rule requires banks to collect beneficial ownership information at the 25 percent ownership threshold regardless of the customer's risk profile."  The FAQs (FAQ 6 and 7) refer to the fact that a financial institution may "choose" to apply a lower threshold and "there may be circumstances where a financial institution may determine a lower threshold may be warranted."  We understand that specifying an expectation that there should be lower beneficial thresholds for certain higher risk customers was an issue that was debated among FinCEN and the bank regulators.For a number of years, many banks have obtained beneficial ownership at lower than 25% thresholds for high risk business lines and customers (e.g., private banking for non-resident aliens).  Banks that have previously applied a lower threshold, however, should carefully evaluate any decision to raise thresholds to the 25% level in the regulation.  If a bank currently applies a lower threshold, raising the threshold may attract regulatory scrutiny about whether the move was justified from a risk standpoint.  Moreover, a risk-based program should address not only regulatory risk, but also money laundering risk.  Therefore, banks should consider reviewing beneficial ownership at lower thresholds for certain customers and business lines and when a legal entity customer has an unusually complex or opaque ownership structure for the type of customer regardless of the business line or risk rating of the customer. New Accounts:  The new chapters do not discuss one of the most controversial and challenging requirements of the CDD rule, the requirement to verify CDD information when a customer previously subject to CDD opens a new account, including when CDs are rolled over or loans renewed.  This most likely may be because application of the requirement to CD rollovers and loan renewals is still under consideration by FinCEN, as discussed above. Enhanced Due Diligence:  The requirement to maintain enhanced due diligence ("EDD") policies, procedures, and processes for higher risk customers remains with no new suggested categories of customers that should be subject to EDD. Risk Rating:  The new CDD Chapter seems to articulate an expectation to risk rate customers:  "The bank should have an understanding of the money laundering and terrorist financing risk of its customers, referred to in the rule as the customer risk profile.  This concept is also commonly referred to as the customer risk rating."  The CDD Chapter, therefore, could be read as expressing for banks an expectation that goes beyond FinCEN's expectation for all covered financial institutions in FAQ 35, which states that a customer profile "may, but need not, include a system of risk ratings or categories of customers."  It appears that banks that do not currently risk rate customers should consider doing so.  Since the CDD section was first drafted in 2006 and amended in 2007, customer risk rating based on an established method with weighted risk factors has become a best and almost universal practice for banks to facilitate the AML risk assessment, CDD/EDD, and the identification of suspicious activity. Enterprise-Wide CDD:  The new CDD Chapter recognizes the CDD approach of many complex organizations that have CDD requirements and functions that cross financial institution legal entities and the general enterprise-wide approach to BSA/AML long referenced in the BSA/AML Manual.  See BSA/AML Manual, BSA/AML Compliance Program Structures Overview, at p. 155.  The CDD Chapter states that a bank "may choose to implement CDD policies, procedures and processes on an enterprise-wide basis to the extent permitted by law sharing across business lines, legal entities, and with affiliate support units." Conclusion Despite the CDD regulation, at its core CDD compliance is still risk based and regulatory risk remains a concern.  Every bank must carefully and continually review its CDD program against the regulatory requirements and expectations articulated in the BSA/AML Manual, as well as recent regulatory enforcement actions, the institution's past examination and independent and compliance testing issues, and best practices of peer institutions.  This review will help anticipate whether there are aspects of its CDD/EDD program that could be subject to criticism in the examination process.  As the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit recently recognized, detailed manuals issued by agencies with enforcement authority like the BSA/AML Manual "can put regulated banks on notice of expected conduct."  California Pacific Bank v. Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, 885 F.3d 560, 572 (9th Cir. 2018).  The BSA/AML Manual is an important and welcome roadmap although not always as up to date, clear or detailed as banks would like it to be. These were the first revisions to the BSA/AML Manual since 2014.  We understand that additional revisions to other chapters are under consideration.    [1]   May 11, 2018 also was the compliance date for the CDD regulations.  The Notice of Final Rulemaking for the CDD regulation, which was published on May 11, 2016, provided a two-year implementation period.  81 Fed. Reg. 29,398 (May 11, 2016).  https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2016-05-11/pdf/2016-10567.pdf. For banks, the new regulation is set forth in the BSA regulations at 31 C.F.R. § 1010.230 (beneficial ownership requirements) and 31 C.F.R. § 1020.210(a)(5).    [2]   The new chapters can be found at: https://www.ffiec.gov/press/pdf/Customer%20Due%20Diligence%20-%20Overview%20and%20Exam%20Procedures-FINAL.pdfw  (CDD Chapter) and https://www.ffiec.gov/press/pdf/Beneficial%20Ownership%20Requirements%20for %20Legal%20Entity%20CustomersOverview-FINAL.pdf (Beneficial Ownership Chapter).    [3]   Frequently Asked Questions Regarding Customer Due Diligence Requirements for Financial Institutions, FIN-2018-G001.  https://www.fincen.gov/resources/statutes-regulations/guidance/frequently-asked-questions-regarding-customer-due-0.  On April 23, 2018, Gibson Dunn published a client alert on these FAQs.  FinCEN Issues FAQs on Customer Due Diligence Regulation.  https://www.gibsondunn.com/fincen-issues-faqs-on-customer-due-diligence-regulation/. FinCEN also issued FAQs on the regulation on September 29, 2017. https://www.fincen.gov/sites/default/files/2016-09/FAQs_for_CDD_Final_Rule_%287_15_16%29.pdf.    [4]   Beneficial Ownership Requirements for Legal Entity Customers of Certain Financial Products and Services with Automatic Rollovers or Renewals, FIN-2018-R002.  https://www.fincen.gov/sites/default/files/2018-05/FinCEN%20Ruling%20CD%20and%20Loan%20Rollover%20Relief_FINAL%20508-revised.pdf    [5]   The BSA/AML Manual previously stated at p. 57:  "CDD processes should include periodic risk-based monitoring of the customer relationship to determine if there are substantive changes to the original CDD information. . . ." Gibson Dunn's lawyers  are available to assist in addressing any questions you may have regarding these developments.  Please contact any member of the Gibson Dunn team, the Gibson Dunn lawyer with whom you usually work in the firm's Financial Institutions practice group, or the authors: Stephanie L. Brooker - Washington, D.C. (+1 202-887-3502, sbrooker@gibsondunn.com) M. Kendall Day - Washington, D.C. (+1 202-955-8220, kday@gibsondunn.com) Arthur S. Long - New York (+1 212-351-2426, along@gibsondunn.com) Linda Noonan - Washington, D.C. (+1 202-887-3595, lnoonan@gibsondunn.com) © 2018 Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher LLP Attorney Advertising:  The enclosed materials have been prepared for general informational purposes only and are not intended as legal advice.
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